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Discuss: July Book Club Picks

Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong—and the New Research That’s Rewriting the Story by Angela Saini

 

51De22rhWIL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Whether looking at intelligence or emotion, cognition or behavior, science has continued to tell us that men and women are fundamentally different. Biologists claim that women are better suited to raising families or are, more gently, uniquely empathetic. Men, on the other hand, continue to be described as excelling at tasks that require logic, spatial reasoning, and motor skills. But a huge wave of research is now revealing an alternative version of what we thought we knew. The new woman revealed by this scientific data is as strong, strategic, and smart as anyone else.

Discuss this book with 3,259 other people 🢂

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Mind in Life: Biology, Phenomenology, and the Sciences of Mind by Evan Thompson

 

411pT27bOLL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Thompson draws upon sources as diverse as molecular biology, evolutionary theory, artificial life, complex systems theory, neuroscience, psychology, Continental Phenomenology, and analytic philosophy to argue that mind and life are more continuous than has previously been accepted, and that current explanations do not adequately address the myriad facets of the biology and phenomenology of mind. Where there is life, Thompson argues, there is mind.

Discuss this book with 155 other people 🢂

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Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid by Douglas R. Hofstadter

 

512BblrQFqL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_Douglas Hofstadter’s book is concerned directly with the nature of “maps” or links between formal systems. However, according to Hofstadter, the formal system that underlies all mental activity transcends the system that supports it. If life can grow out of the formal chemical substrate of the cell, if consciousness can emerge out of a formal system of firing neurons, then so too will computers attain human intelligence. Gödel, Escher, Bach is a wonderful exploration of fascinating ideas at the heart of cognitive science: meaning, reduction, recursion, and much more.

Discuss this book with 155 other people 🢂

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Brave New Arctic: The Untold Story of the Melting North by Mark C. Serreze

 

51Udm9-NGbL._SX319_BO1,204,203,200_In a sweeping tale of discovery spanning three decades, Serreze describes how puzzlement turned to concern and astonishment as researchers came to understand that the Arctic of old was quickly disappearing–with potentially devastating implications for the entire planet A gripping scientific adventure story, Brave New Arctic shows how the Arctic’s extraordinary transformation serves as a harbinger of things to come if we fail to meet the challenge posed by a warming Earth.

Book Club Meetup in Cambridge, MA 🡆

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Dreaming: A Very Short Introduction by J. Allan Hobson

 

41PL0CB6L0L._SX319_BO1,204,203,200_What is dreaming, and what causes it? Why are dreams so strange and why are they so hard to remember? Replacing dream mystique with modern dream science, J. Allan Hobson provides a new and increasingly complete picture of how dreaming is created by the brain. Focusing on dreaming to explain the mechanisms of sleep, this book explores how the new science of dreaming is affecting theories in psychoanalysis, and how it is helping our understanding of the causes of mental illness.

Book Club Meetup in New York City 🡆

 

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